Westport Weston Health District to offer COVID booster clinic

FILE - A man gets a COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site at the Natick Mall on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, in Natick, Mass. U.S. experts are expected to recommend COVID-19 vaccine boosters for all Americans, regardless of age, eight months after they received their second dose of the shot, to ensure lasting protection against the coronavirus as the delta variant spreads across the country. An announcement was expected as soon as this week, with doses beginning to be administered widely once the Food and Drug Administration formally approves the vaccines. (Matt Stone/The Boston Herald via AP, Pool)

FILE - A man gets a COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site at the Natick Mall on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, in Natick, Mass. U.S. experts are expected to recommend COVID-19 vaccine boosters for all Americans, regardless of age, eight months after they received their second dose of the shot, to ensure lasting protection against the coronavirus as the delta variant spreads across the country. An announcement was expected as soon as this week, with doses beginning to be administered widely once the Food and Drug Administration formally approves the vaccines. (Matt Stone/The Boston Herald via AP, Pool)

Matt Stone / Associated Press

WESTPORT — The Westport Weston Health District will offer a booster clinic, providing a third dose of the Moderna vaccine for immunocompromised people.

The clinic will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Westport Center for Senior Activities. Patients must bring their vaccination card with them. Appointments must be made through the Vaccine Administration Management System.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, those now eligible for a booster dose of vaccine include people who have been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood; received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system; received a stem cell transplant within the last two years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system; those with moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome or WiskottAldrich syndrome); advanced or untreated HIV infection and those receiving active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response.

The WWHD recommends people speak with their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

Booster dose clinics for the general public will be scheduled when approval is given by the Food & Drug Administration, which is expected in late September.