Taking a swing at poetic ruminations appropriate for Westport these days, inspired by "Bridge over Troubled Water," a song by the legendary music duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel from their album, “Bridge over Troubled Water.”

That song, according to Internet sources, was released with the album on Jan. 26, 1970. Composed by singer-songwriter Paul Simon, the song became Simon & Garfunkel's biggest hit single and won Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Song of the Year in 1971.

Now, nearly 45 years later, here’s an ode about preserving the Bridge Street bridge, the 131-year-old swing bridge over the Saugatuck River. The words are infused with the spirit of Simon and Garfunkle's famous song:

Troubled Bridge over Saugatuck Water

“When you're weary and old (circa 1884), the oldest surviving swing bridge in our state with a safety rating of only five out of 10.

Feeling spent and small (some 30 years since last revived) after Marty Hauhuth courageously led the battle to save you.

When tears are in your eyes (from rust, disrepair, and overuse), I will dry them all.

I'm on your side. (The majority of townspeople appear to favor preserving your "character" and 300-foot length).

When times get rough (and bureaucrats oppose saving it).

And friends just can't be found, (even in Saugatuck, your home).

Like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down.

Like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down.

When you're down and out, when you're on the street, when evening falls so hard, I will comfort you.

I'll take your part (officialdom and the voters), when darkness comes and pain is all around.

Like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down

Sail on Silver Girl, sail on by, your time has come to shine.

All your dreams are on their way, see how they shine.

If you need a friend, I'm sailing right behind.

Like a bridge over troubled water, I will ease your mind.

Like a bridge over troubled water, I will ease your mind.”

There is hope ahead in the spring of 2016 to again restore this storied bridge with a great plan to retain its historic look. And a promise by our leader, Jim Marpe, for all Westporters to speak their minds, including the press (like my fellow columnist Dan Woog and myself), in a grass-roots effort to arrive at a consensus that will carry the day.

Woody Klein is a Westport writer — admittedly not a poet. An author and former editor of the Westport News, he can be reached at wklein11@aol.com.